Towson University Women's Studies


Call for Papers–Mothers and the Economy: The Economics of Mothering Conference
July 14, 2010, 12:47 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , ,

Here is a CFP for a conference being held October 21-23, 2010, in Toronto, Canada. Abstracts (250 words) and bios (50 words) are due by AUGUST 1st, 2010. Send abstracts to info@motherhoodinitiative.org. Submissions are welcomed from scholars, students, activists, and workers, artists, mothers and others who work or research in this area. Cross-cultural, historical and comparative work is encouraged. We encourage a variety of types of submissions including academic papers from all disciplines, workshops, creative submissions, performances, storytelling, visual arts and other alternative formats.

One must be a member of Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement (MIRCI) to present at this conference. Membership will begin May 1, 2010.

 Topics can include (but are not limited to):

the economics of maintaining sustainable family systems; mothering, appropriate technology and economics; mothering and microcredit; mothering and economic activism; mothering and economic activism through the arts; mothering with reduced resources; social and economic supports for mothering; mothering within the neoliberal context; motherwork and valuation of motherwork, mothering and the economics of unpaid labour; mothers-as-providers, mother-led cooperatives; the effects of privatization/commodification on women; mothering and the economics of raising children with disabilities; the economics of maternal mortality rates; the “selling” of mothering and the economics of consumerism;  consumption and the marketing of mothering; the economics of reproductive technologies and surrogacy; structural adjustment policies and mothering; the financial implications for mothers of family law reforms and welfare state developments, the economic impacts of environmental degradation on mothering; quantifications of mothering/caregiving/parenting as a part of the base structure of the economic productivity of society; children as economic assets/burdens; the actual value of domestic/unpaid labour; motherhood and the gender pay gap, mothering and the feminization of poverty; mothering, occupational segregation and the wage gap; the impacts of economic globalization on mothering and kinship networks; the envisioning and articulation of more human-centered economic systems and policies to enhance mothering/caregiving practices; transformations of male breadwinner-female caretaker models; the economics of caregiving/parenting in nontraditional households; mothering and the “new home economics”; mothering, feminist economics and social justice; mothering and welfare policies; mothering and health care costs; the commodification of domestic labour; global and transnational motherhood, transnational families in the new global economy; the economics of the second shift; global care chains; mothering/caregiving/parenting and economic justice, motherwork in organisations; mothers’ economic transactions; mothers’ labour paid and unpaid; mothers in enterprise and mothers in alternative enterprise; mothers and non-monetary economic flows; mothers in the workplace; homeschooling mothers; mothers as consumers; mothers and Marxism; mothers and neo-liberalism; mothers in a capitalist economy; mothers in a diverse economy; mothers and food economies; mother’s milk and breastfeeding; the economic roles of mothers in undeveloped economies; the economic roles of mothers in non-Western cultures; mothering and economic subjectivity; mothers as alternative economic activists.

CONFIRMED KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:

Patrizia Albanese, author of Mothers of the Nation

Andrea Doucet, author of Do Men Mother: Fathering, Care & Domestic Responsibility

Martha Albertson Fineman, author of The Autonomy Myth: A Theory of Dependency

Eva Feder Kittay, author of Love’s Labor: Essays on Women, Equality, and Dependency
Bonnie Fox, author of When Couples Become Parents

Marilyn Waring, author of If Women Counted: A New Feminist Economics

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